FAMU International AMU = DAMU + FAMU + HAMU

FILM AND TV SCHOOL OF ACADEMY OF PERFORMING ARTS IN PRAGUE

Attendance and Examination regulations

Attendance and Examination regulations

Internal Regulations of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague
The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport, under Section 36 (2) of Act No. 111/1998 Coll., on Higher Education and on a change and supplement to other acts (the Universities Act), registered on 9 August 2010 under ref. no. 21 121/2010-30 the Attendance and Examination Regulations of the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague.
doc. Ing. Václav Vinš, CSc.
director of the higher education department
ATTENDANCE AND EXAMINATION REGULATIONS OF THE ACADEMY
OF PERFORMING ARTS, PRAGUE, 21 May 2010
Part One
Basic Provisions
Article 1
AMU Attendance Regulations
The Attendance and Examination Regulations of the Academy of
Performing Arts, Prague (hereinafter “AMU”) lays down the rules for
studying in accredited B.A, M.A. and Ph.D. programmes offered by AMU
faculties.
Article 2
Academic Year and Course Lengths
(1) Not later than 15 February every year the Rector shall announce the
academic year schedule for the whole of AMU. Among other things, the
academic year schedule stipulates the beginning and end of the next
academic year, beginnings of the individual semesters, deadlines for
enrolling for subjects, vacation periods and other important events
organised by AMU.
(2) The academic year comprises the winter and summer semesters.
(3) Unless the accreditation decision for the study programme states
otherwise, teaching is generally organised in the form of full-time study
according to weekly or semester time-tables.
(4) The Deans announce the schedules for their faculties and in them
stipulate the details for the particular courses within their faculty,
including weekly time-tables which are not included in this AMU
Attendance and Examination Regulations and which are not at variance
with them.
Article 3
AMU Information System
(1) On the day of registration, each AMU student receives corresponding
access to the AMU information system (hereinafter the “Information
System”) and other applications.
(2) AMU communicates with its students primarily through its information
system, i.e. by e-mail sent to an assigned address, by notices and
through messages on the public portal or Intranet, or on the official notice
board on AMU premises. The student shall likewise communicate with
AMU primarily through the information system. AMU notifies students of
particularly important messages in writing.
(3) The AMU study agenda is managed by means of the information
system study components (hereinafter the “study information system”).
The data contained in this system are binding. Through the information
system, students report any changes to their personal data and
continually monitor the fulfilling of their study obligations.
(4) AMU students have the right and obligation to confirm their identity
with the AMU identity card.
Article 4
Study Programmes
(1) The study programme may be:
a) Bachelor’s (B.A.),
b) Master’s (M.A.),
c) Master’s following a Bachelor’s,
d) Doctoral (PhD).
(2) The B.A. programme focuses chiefly on preparing the student for an
occupation or to study in the M.A. programme. The standard study period
is at least three, and at most four years. Study is duly completed with the
state final examination, part of which is the oral defence of a B.A. thesis.
(3) The M.A. programme focuses on the development of the student’s
creative artistic ability at a high level of mastery. The M.A. programme is
connected with the B.A. programme (hereinafter the “connected M.A.
programme”); the standard study period is one, two, or three years. If the
M.A. programme does not follow on from the B.A. programme (hereinafter
the “M.A. programme”), the standard study period is four years. Study in
the M.A. and connected M.A. programme is duly completed with the state
final examination, part of which is the oral defence of the diploma thesis.
(4) The Ph.D. programme focuses on independent research based on
theoretical and theoretical methodological research, or research and
development through creative artistic activity. The standard period of
study is three or four years, depending on accreditation. Studies are
completed with the due completion of a State Doctoral Examination, a
part of which is the defence of a dissertation. Study is duly completed with
the state doctoral examination, part of which is the oral defence of the
dissertation.
Article 5
Study Plans and Subjects
(1) The teaching of the various subjects follows the study plans of the
relevant field. The study plan outlines the obligations that the student
must fulfil for the due completion of the studies. The study plan is made
up of subjects and stipulates the sequence and connectedness involved in
completing them.
(2) The subject is the basic study plan unit. The subject is defined by its
title, course description, number of credits and the method of completion.
In addition to the subjects required in the study plan, a student may also
take subjects as electives from other study disciplines, even from other
AMU faculties, or from another university, if this is organizationally
possible.
(3) The study plan is made up of separate parts (academic years and
semesters) and stipulates the conditions for their successful completion.
The study plan defines the connection between subjects and sets the
teaching semesters for the mandatory subjects.
(4) The subjects or subject groups in the study plan are organised by
category. The category of the subject makes it possible to determine
whether the instruction is elective, the possibility of make-up
examinations, and the possibility of deferring subjects. At AMU the
subjects fall into these categories:
a) main subjects (required subjects for which make-up examinations are
not permitted),
b) required subjects (the subjects cannot be replaced by another subject),
c) required elective subjects (the subject is one of a set of subjects
offered, completion of a part of which is required),
d) elective subjects.
(5) For reasons of capacity, the student may be denied permitted to
register for an elective or required elective subject in a particular
semester.

Part Two
Study in B.A. Programmes
Article 6
Study Organization
(1) The study of all disciplines follows the accredited B.A. programmes.
(2) Study in B.A. programmes under Section 45 of Act No. 111/1998 Coll.,
on Higher Education and on the change and supplementing of other Acts
(the Higher Education Act), as amended (hereinafter the “Act”) is offered
either full-time or, in exceptional cases, part-time.
Article 7
Admissions Procedure
(1) Conditions for admission to the B.A. programme and the submission of
applications are stipulated in Sections 48 to 50 of the Act. The AMU
Faculties lay down the specific requirements for admission and inform
their candidates about them in the usual manner (in particular by the
website, the notice board or an information brochure).
(2) The admissions procedure begins with the delivery of the application
by the deadline announced in the Faculty schedule and concludes with the
decision on the result of the procedure (including review of the decision).
(3) No candidate may be exempted from the admissions procedure to
study in the B.A. programme. An audition forms a normal part of the
admissions procedure. If the candidate fails to complete it successfully,
the admissions procedure for the applicant may be terminated
prematurely.
(4) The Dean shall decide on whether to accept a candidate for the B.A.
programme at the recommendation of the entrance committee. The final
authority in the admissions procedure is the Rector. His/her decision is
final.
(5) Only candidates who have proven their knowledge of the Czech
language during the admissions procedure may be accepted for a B.A.
programme accredited in Czech. The Dean shall decide on the specific
scope of the required knowledge of Czech.
Article 8
Course of Studies
(1) After being accepted the candidate becomes an AMU student upon
registering to study. The Faculties decide on the deadlines for registration.
In serious cases the Dean may permit the student to postpone taking up
their studies by one year.
(2) After registering for a course the student shall take the matriculation
oath.
(3) A student may register for a higher school year if he/she has met the
conditions stated by the relevant course’s study plan for the previous
school year.
(4) Students shall monitor the fulfilment of their study obligations on an
ongoing basis and shall discuss any uncertainties with their study
department. AMU and its faculties use the information system and other
usual methods to inform students of their duties and binding deadlines
relating to the study.
(5) Study in B.A. programmes offered by AMU is quantified by a credit
system based on the European Credit Transfer System (hereinafter
“ECTS”). Credits allocated to the various subjects indicate how demanding
they are and the corresponding volume of work and degree of difficulty
that the student must master in order to successfully complete the
relevant subject.
(6) In the three-year B.A. programme the student must obtain 180
credits. 240 credits are required for the four-year B.A. programme.
(7) A student can ask for a registered subject to be deferred to the
following semester. A student may request to withdraw from an elective
subject for which he/she is registered.
(8) Credits are used to enable the student’s mobility. A student sent by
AMU to study at a foreign university has subjects and credits obtained at
the foreign university recognized in accordance with the contents of
his/her study programme. The Dean rules on recognition of credits. The
AMU credit system is compatible with the European Credit Transfer
System (ECTS), facilitating the mobility of students within the framework
of European educational programmes.
(9) Where there are pressing grounds to do so, studies may be
interrupted, even repeatedly. Studies may be interrupted for not more
than two years in total. Interruptions of studies are subject to the rules
laid down by the individual faculties.
(10) If there are material grounds to do so, a student may ask for a year
of study to be spread over two academic years. A year can only be spread
once during study on one B.A. programme.
(11) In extraordinary cases a student may ask the Dean to combine
years.
Article 9
Grading and Assessment of Studies
(1) Studies are assessed by credits and examinations stipulated by study
plans; the student is notified of these through the information system.
(2) Before the end of instruction in a semester, the pedagogue schedules
a sufficient number of regular examination dates and publishes them on
the information system. The student registers for examinations in the
information system.

(3) The student is entitled to a second and third attempt to pass an
examination. If neither of these attempts proves successful, the Dean
may in exceptional cases permit a fourth attempt, known as a Dean’s
Examination. A Dean’s Examination is administered by a commission with
the participation of the dean or of a vice-dean appointed by the dean. No
repeat of an examination is permitted for the main subjects and for
written examinations.
If the student is evaluated with an “F” or “credit denied”, his/her studies
shall be terminated in accordance with Section 56 (1)(b) of the Act. The
decision is covered by Section 68 of the Act.
(4) If, for serious reasons, a student is unable appear at an examination,
he/she shall excuse him/herself in advance; otherwise he/she shall be
regarded as having failed the examination. A student may also arrange
with a pedagogue to sit for an examination before the stipulated date.
(5) The credit is an ungraded form of assessment of studies. It is
allocated upon fulfilment of obligations stipulated for individual subjects
and is recorded in the information system with the word “Credited” (Z).
(6) An examination is a graded form of assessment of studies, which tests
knowledge and level of creativity in the relevant subject. It may be
practical, written, oral or a combination of the above. For the main
subjects, the examinations are usually conducted before the committee.
The examinations are graded on the scale “A, B, C, D, E, F”.
A (excellent work exceeding the relevant criteria),
B (above-average work with a minimum of errors),
C (average work with an acceptable number of errors),
D (acceptable work with a large number of errors),
E (work that meets the minimum requirements),
F (unacceptable work).
Apart from the aforementioned scale, the letter “X” may also be used in
the information system; this indicates that it has been decided not to
allocate a grade for the relevant examination date.
(7) The evaluation of the student is registered in the information system
and is recorded in writing. In the event of a discrepancy, the written
record shall have priority. The evaluation must be registered in the
information system within two working days following the examination or
the allocation of the credit.
(8) Fulfilment of study requirements is inspected at the end of each
semester or academic year. Inspections of fulfilment of study
requirements primarily involve:
a) completion of study of required subjects,
b) earning of the minimum number of credits or completion of subjects
from groups of required elective subjects,
c) earning a sufficient number of credits from elective subjects.
d) completion of study of deferred subjects,
e) conditions established by a pedagogue at the beginning of instruction
of each subject for completion of study of the subject including attendance
at the required percentage of classes and the criteria for work required.
Article 10
State Final Examinations
(1) The Bachelor’s programme is duly completed with the state final
examination. This examination is held before an examination committee
comprised of the faculty’s professors, assistant professors and expert
assistants, or of invited experts approved by the faculty’s artistic council.
The state final examination and announcement of the results are public.
(2) The student must sit for a state final examination within two academic
years of fulfilling the study obligations of the relevant study plan.
(3) A student who has fulfilled the conditions for the relevant study plan,
submitted a Bachelor’s thesis with all required formalities and obtained
the required number of credits may register for the state final
examination. The examination includes an oral defence of the Bachelor’s
thesis. The Dean stipulates the content of the state final examination for
individual study fields on the basis of the recommendation of the relevant
division.
(4) The supervisor’s and examiner’s written assessments of the Bachelor’s
thesis must expressly state whether they recommend or do not
recommend the work for oral defence. If the supervisor and examiner do
not recommend the thesis for oral defence, the student cannot be allowed
to defend the Bachelor’s thesis. A student who has not been permitted to
defend the Bachelor’s thesis or has failed to defend the thesis is given the
grade of “F” by the examination committee.
(5) The state final examination is classified with the marks “A, B, C, D, E,
F”. The examination committee decides the overall assessment for the
state final examination by a vote taken in private. For an overall grade of
“A” the artistic work and defence of the Bachelor’s thesis must be
assessed “A” and none of the subjects may be assessed lower than “B”. If
the student is graded “F” for any part of the state final examination, the
overall result of the final examination shall also be graded as “F”.
(6) The defence of a Bachelor’s thesis and the state final examination may
only be repeated once. The student repeats only those parts of the state
final examination that have been marked with the grade “F”. The artistic
part of the state final examination may not be repeated.
Article 11
Completion of Studies
(1) Studies in a Bachelor’s programme conducted at an AMU faculty are
duly completed with the state final examination.
(2) Studies may also be completed pursuant to Section 56 of the Act.
(3) Section 65 (1)(c) of the Act and Section 67 of the Act stipulate the
student’s expulsion from the school as the most severe penalty possible
for a disciplinary misdemeanour.
(4) A student who gives up his/her studies, has been expelled or who has
otherwise terminated his/her studies, is entitled to a document confirming
the examinations successfully completed and credits earned. The
document must also state that the student has not duly completed the
studies.
(5) Graduates of the Bachelor’s programmes are awarded the academic
title “Bachelor of Arts” (“BcA.”, the title coming before the name). An
addendum to the diploma containing a list of the completed subjects and
earned credits for the whole study period forms a supplement to the
University diploma.
Part Three
Studies in Master’s and follow-on Master’s programmes
Article 12
Organization of Studies
(1) The study of all disciplines follows the accredited Master’s and follow-
on Master’s programmes.
(2) The Master’s and follow-on Master’s programmes (Section 45 of the
Act) are offered full-time and part-time.
Article 13
Admissions Procedure
(1) Acceptance to the follow-on Master’s study programme is based on an
admissions procedure. The conditions for admission to Master’s and
follow-on Master’s studies and the method of submitting applications are
stipulated in Sections 48 to 50 of the Act. The AMU faculties lay down the
specific requirements for admission and inform their candidates in the
usual manner (in particular by the website, the official notice board or
information brochure).
(2) The admissions procedure begins with delivery of the application by
the deadline announced in the faculty schedule and concludes with a
decision on the result of the procedure (including a review of the
decision).
(3) No candidate may be exempted from the admissions procedure to
study in the Master’s and follow-on Master’s programme. An audition
forms a normal part of the admissions procedure. If the candidate fails to
complete it successfully, the admissions procedure may be terminated
prematurely.
(4) The Dean shall decide on whether to accept a candidate for the
Master’s or follow-on Master’s programme at the recommendation of the
admissions committee. The final authority in the admissions procedure is
the Rector. His/her decision is final.
(5) Only candidates who have duly proven their knowledge of the Czech
language may be accepted for the Master’s and follow-on Master’s
programme accredited in Czech. The Dean shall decide on the specific
scope of the required knowledge of Czech.
Article 14
Course of Studies
(1) After being admitted the candidate becomes an AMU student upon
enrolling to study. The faculties decide on the deadlines for enrolment. In
serious cases the Dean may permit students to postpone taking up their
studies by one year.
(2) After enrolling, the student becomes a member of the academic body.
(3) A student may enrol for a higher school year if he/she has met the
conditions stated by the study plan of the relevant subject for the
previous school year.
(4) Students shall monitor the fulfilment of their study obligations on an
ongoing basis and shall discuss any uncertainties with their faculty’s study
department. AMU and its Faculties use the information system and other
usual methods to inform students of their duties and binding deadlines
relating to the study.
(5) Studies in Master’s study programmes offered by AMU are quantified
by a credit system based on the European Credit Transfer System
(hereinafter “ECTS”). The credits allocated to the various subjects indicate
how demanding they are and the corresponding volume of work and
degree of difficulty that the student must master in order to successfully
complete the relevant subject.
(6) In the follow-on Master’s study programme, the student must earn
120 credits in two-year, 180 in three-year and 240 in four-year Master’s
study programmes.
(7) A student can ask for the registered subject to be deferred to the
following semester under conditions stipulated by the faculty.
(8) Credits are a tool enabling students’ mobility. A student sent by AMU
to study at a foreign university has subjects and credits obtained at the
foreign university recognized in accordance with their contents of his/her
study programme after a prior statement by the guarantor. The Dean
rules on the recognition of credits. The AMU credit system is compatible
with the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS), facilitating the mobility
of students within the framework of European educational programmes.
(9) Where there are pressing grounds to do so, studies can be
interrupted, even repeatedly. Studies may be interrupted for not more
than two years in total. Interruptions of studies are subject to the rules
laid down by the individual Faculties.
(10) If there are serious reasons to do so, a student may ask for a year of
study to be spread over two academic years. Only one year of study may
be spread over two years during in one follow-on Master’s programme or
Master’s programme.
(11) In extraordinary cases a student may ask the Dean to combine years
of study.
Article 15
Grading and Assessment of the Study
(1) Studies are assessed by credits and examinations stipulated by the
study plans; the student is notified of these through the information
system.
(2) Before the end of instruction in a semester, the pedagogue schedules
a sufficient number of regular examination dates and publishes them on
the information system. The student registers for an examination in the
information system, unless provided for otherwise.
(3) The student is entitled to a second and third attempt to pass an
examination. If neither of these attempts proves successful the Dean may
in exceptional cases permit a fourth attempt, known as a Dean’s
Examination. A Dean’s Examination is administered by a commission with
the participation of the dean or of a vice-dean appointed by the dean. No
repeat of an examination is permitted for the main subjects and for
written examinations; if the student is receives the grade “F”, his/her
studies shall be terminated in accordance with Section 56 (1)(b) of the
Act. The decision is covered by Section 68 of the Act.
(4) If, for serious reasons, the student is not able appear at an
examination, he/she shall excuse him/herself in advance, otherwise
he/she shall be regarded as not having passed the examination. The
student may also arrange with the pedagogue to sit for the examination
before the stipulated date.
(5) Credit is an ungraded form of assessing studies. It is allocated upon
fulfilment of the obligations stipulated for individual subjects and is
recorded in the information system with the word “Credited” (Z).
(6) An examination is a graded form of assessing studies which tests
knowledge and level of creativity in the relevant subject. It may be
practical, written, oral or a combination of the above. For the main
subjects, the examinations are usually conducted before the committee.
The examinations are graded on the scale “A, B, C, D, E, F”.
A (excellent work exceeding the relevant criteria),
B (above-average work with the minimum of errors),
C (average work with an acceptable number of errors),
D (acceptable work with a large number of errors),
E (work that meets the minimum requirements),
F (unacceptable work).
Apart from the aforementioned scale, the letter “X” may also be used in
the information system; this indicates that it has been decided not to
allocate a grade for the relevant date.
(7) The evaluation of the student is recorded in the information system,
and is also recorded in writing. In the event of a discrepancy the written
record shall have priority. The evaluation must be recorded in the
information system within two working days following the examination or
the allocation of the credit.
(8) Fulfilment of study requirements is inspected at the end of each
semester or academic year. Inspections of fulfilment of study
requirements primarily involve:
a) completion of study of required subjects,
b) earning of the minimum number of credits or completion of subjects
from groups of required elective subjects,
c) earning a sufficient number of credits from elective subjects.
d) completion of study of deferred subjects,
e) conditions established by a pedagogue at the beginning of instruction
of each subject for completion of study of the subject including attendance
at the required percentage of classes and the criteria for work required.
Article 16
State Final Examinations
(1) The Master’s and follow-on Master’s programmes are duly completed
with the state final examination. This examination is held before an
examination committee comprised of the faculty’s professors, assistant
professors and expert assistants, or of invited experts approved by the
faculty’s artistic council. The state final examination and announcement of
the results are public.
(2) The student must sit for a state final examination within two academic
years of fulfilling the study obligations of the relevant study plan.
(3) A student who has fulfilled the conditions for the relevant study plan,
turned in a Master’s thesis with all required related formalities and
obtained the required number of credits may register for the state final
examination. The examination includes an oral defence of the Master’s
thesis. The Dean stipulates the contents of the state final examination for
individual fields of study on the basis of the proposal of the relevant
division.
(4) The supervisor’s and examiner’s written assessments of the Master’s
thesis must expressly state whether they recommend or do not
recommend the work for oral defence. If the supervisor and examiner do
not recommend the thesis for oral defence, the student cannot be allowed
to defend the diploma thesis. A student who has not been permitted to
defend the diploma thesis or has not defended the thesis is graded with
an “F” for defence of the thesis by the examination committee.
(5) The state final examination is evaluated with the grades “A, B, C, D, E,
F”. The examination committee decides the overall assessment for the
state final examination by a vote taken in private. For an overall
assessment of “A”, the artistic work and defence of the diploma thesis
must be graded “A” and none of the subjects may be graded lower than
“B”. If the student is graded “F” for any part of the state final
examination, the overall result of the final examination shall also be
graded “F”.
(6) The state final examination may only be repeated once. The student
repeats only those parts of the state final examination that were originally
classified with an “F”. The artistic part of the final examination may not be
repeated.
Article 17
Completion of Studies
(1) Studies in Master’s programmes offered by the AMU faculties are duly
completed with the state final examination.
(2) Studies may also be terminated pursuant to Section 56 of the Act.
(3) Section 65 (1)(c) of the Act and Section 67 of the Act stipulate the
student’s expulsion from the school as the most severe penalty for a
disciplinary misdemeanour.
(4) A student who gives up his/her studies, has been expelled or who has
otherwise terminated his/her studies is entitled to a document confirming
the examinations successfully completed and credits earned. The
document must also state that the student has not duly completed the
studies.
(5) Graduates of the Master’s and follow-on Master’s programmes are
awarded the academic title “Master of Arts” (“MgA.”, the title coming
before the name). An addendum to the diploma containing a list of the
completed subjects and the number of credits earned for the whole study
period forms a supplement to the university diploma.
Part Four
Studies in Doctoral Programmes
Article 18
Organization of Studies
(1) Studies of all fields of study are conducted in accordance with the
accredited doctoral study programmes.
(2) Doctoral programmes focus on independent research based on
theoretical or methodological research, or on research or development
through creative artistic activity and theoretical reflection upon that work.
(3) The doctoral programme is offered full-time or part-time. The normal
length of the doctoral programme is three or four years, depending on its
accreditation. For serious reasons, at the student’s request or at the
recommendation of the subject committee the Dean may allow the studies
to be interrupted for one year, or for longer in exceptional cases.
(4) The maximum length of the doctoral program from registration to its
due completion is five or six years in the case of full-time studies, while in
cases of combined studies the period may be extended by a year. This
time limit does not include the period for which the student’s studies have
been interrupted.
(5) Within the faculty, the Dean or his/her appointed vice-dean is
responsible for the organization, administration and assessment of studies
in a doctoral study programme; at AMU this is the responsibility of the
Rector or his/her appointed vice-rector.
(6) Studies in a doctoral study programme may be quantified by ECTS
credits.
Article 19
Admissions Procedure
(1) The Dean publicly announces admissions procedures for doctoral
programmes at the suggestion of the chairman of a subject committee.
(2) The Dean appoints the admissions examination committee and its
chairman at the suggestion of the subject committee chairman. The
committee has at least five members, including possible representatives
of the relevant specialisations relating to the candidates’ dissertation
projects submitted as part of the admissions procedure. The committee
decides the examination result by a majority of votes from the members
present at a closed meeting. If the votes cast are tied, the chairman’s
vote shall be decisive.
(3) The Dean of the relevant faculty decides the course and components
of the admissions examination.
(4) The Dean shall decide on whether to accept a candidate for studies in
the doctoral programme at the recommendation of the admissions
committee. The final authority in the entrance procedure is the Rector.
His/her decision is final.
(5) Only candidates who have duly proven their knowledge of the Czech
language may be accepted to study in a doctoral programme accredited in
Czech, by passing the Czech language examination at the AMU Language
Preparation Centre with at level B2 in accordance with the Common
European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR).
Article 20
Course of Studies
(1) After being admitted the candidate becomes an AMU student on the
day of enrolling to study. The faculties decide on the dates for enrolment
for individual school years and inform the student in the usual manner.
(2) After enrolling the student becomes a member of the academic body.
(3) Studies in the doctoral program are directed by the chairman of the
subject committee or the relevant vice-dean, who is responsible to the
Dean for the course of the study. The Dean appoints members of the
subject committee primarily from the ranks of the faculty’s academic staff
and other notable persons in the field.
(4) The subject committee has a quorum if an absolute majority of its
members is present. An absolute majority of members present is required
for a decision to be approved. If there is an even division of votes, the
chairman’s vote shall be decisive.
(5) At the proposal of the subject committee, the Dean shall appoint a
supervisor for each student in a doctoral programme. These may come
from members of the faculty’s academic staff or may be teachers from
outside the faculty and AMU who have the required qualifications to
perform such activity. The Dean shall stipulate the duties and powers of
these supervisors.
Article 21
Grading and Assessment of Studies
(1) Studies are assessed by credits and examinations stipulated by the
individual study plan.
(2) Credit is an unclassified form of assessment of studies. It is allocated
upon fulfilment of the whole set of obligations stipulated for individual
subjects and is recorded in the doctoral study records or the information
system with the word “Credited” (Z).
(3) The examination is a graded form of assessing studies, which tests
knowledge and level of creativity in the relevant subject. It may be
practical, written, oral or a combination of the above and is graded with
the words “pass” – “fail” and is recorded in the doctoral study records or
the information system.

Article 22
Dissertation Defence and State Doctoral Examination
(1) The oral defence of a dissertation is public. A precondition for the
holding of an oral dissertation defence is the fulfilment of the
requirements of the individual study plan for the doctoral study
programme, including the submission of the dissertation with all required
formalities. The result of the oral defence is also announced in public by
the chairman of the committee for the state doctoral examination. If the
result of the oral defence is negative, the Dean shall notify the student in
writing of the committee’s decision. In accordance with its conclusions the
committee shall state in the decision the conditions under which the oral
defence may be held again. The student may request an oral defence of
the revised dissertation within five months to one year of the unsuccessful
oral defence. The oral defence may only be repeated once. A successful
oral defence is a necessary precondition for the conducting of a state final
examination.
(2) The state doctoral examination is held in public. The precondition for
conducting a state doctoral examination is the fulfilment of the individual
study plan of the doctoral study programme, the submission of a
dissertation with all required formalities, and its successful oral defence.
(3) The student registers in writing for the defence of a dissertation and
for the state doctoral examination.
(4) The committee for the oral defence and the state doctoral examination
and its chairman are appointed by the dean at the suggestion of the
subject committee. Committees shall have at least five members. Eligible
for appointment as committee members are professors, associate
professors and experts approved by the faculty’s artistic council. At least
one committee member must be from a department outside of the faculty.
The supervisor participates at the oral defence and examination as an
auxiliary committee member in an advisory capacity. The thesis of the
dissertation must be available to committee members at least ten days in
advance of the oral defence.
(5) The result of the oral defence is evaluated with the words “successful
defence” or “unsuccessful defence”, and the result of a doctoral
examination is evaluated with the words “pass” or “fail”. The committee
for a state doctoral examination deliberates on the results in a closed
meeting.
(6) A state doctoral examination may be repeated only once.
Article 23
Completion of Studies
(1) Studies in doctoral programmes offered by AMU faculties are duly
completed with the oral defence of a dissertation and the state doctoral
examination.
(2) Studies may also be terminated pursuant to Section 56 of the Act.
(3) Section 65 (1)(c) of the Act and Section 67 of the Act stipulate the
student’s expulsion from the studies as the most severe penalty for a
disciplinary misdemeanour.
(4) A student who gives up his/her studies, has been expelled or who has
otherwise terminated his/her studies is entitled to a document confirming
the examinations successfully completed. The document must also state
that the student has not duly completed the studies.
(5) Graduates of doctoral study programmes are awarded the academic
title “Doctor” (abbreviated as “Ph.D.” after the name). An addendum to
the diploma containing a list of the completed subjects for the whole study
period forms a supplement to the University diploma.

Part Five
Concluding Provisions
Article 24
(1) The Attendance and Examination Regulations registered by the
Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport on 12 March 2007 under
no. 8 181/2007-30 shall no longer be in force.
(2) These Attendance and Examination Regulations were approved in
accordance with Section 9 (1)(b) of the Act by the Academic Senate of
AMU on 21 May 2010.
(3) Under Section 36 (4) of the Act, these Attendance and Examination
Regulations shall take effect on the day they are registered at the Ministry
of Education, Youth and Sport.
(signed) Ivo Mathé,
Rector of AMU